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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

4 edition of factors associated with short-term prognosis of conservatively treated lateral epicondylitis found in the catalog.

factors associated with short-term prognosis of conservatively treated lateral epicondylitis

Esther J. Waugh

factors associated with short-term prognosis of conservatively treated lateral epicondylitis

by Esther J. Waugh

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Published by National Library of Canada in Ottawa .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Sc.) -- University of Toronto, 2002.

SeriesCanadian theses = -- Th`eses canadiennes
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination2 microfiches : negative.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21789400M
ISBN 100612688240
OCLC/WorldCa54461004

  Lateral epicondylitis associated with cumulative trauma as seen in the clinical setting has usually involved long-term care with fair results. This paper describes the structured treatment program for lateral epicondylitis developed at the Michigan Hand Rehabilitation Center in Warren, by:   Lateral epicondylitis has several different treatment methods, with no single agreed upon therapy. This article summarizes the current literature on injection therapies for lateral epicondylitis. Glucocorticoid, botulinum toxin, autologous blood, platelet-rich plasma, hyaluronic acid, polidocanol, glycosaminoglycan, and prolotherapy injections are discussed.

A lot of the advice you’ll find online for tennis elbow pain is a swing and a miss. Don’t waste time overstretching, which could cause more damage. Instead, try these 3 lateral epicondylitis exercises. Tennis Elbow Time Out. Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is a repetitive stress injury that causes painful symptoms. It can keep you. Several lateral epicondylitis treatment options exist that can help speed healing time, including: Resting the arm as much as possible. The muscles of the shoulder and upper arm should be favored when the arm is being used.

Lateral epicondylitis can be treated by excision of the chronic granulation tissue of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and subsequent repair with appropriate immobilization while the tendon heals. In general, patients with epicondylitis do well - especially if they interpret the pain as a signal to stop doing what is causing the pain. Lateral and Medial Epicondylitis of the Elbow Frank W. Jobe, MD, and Michael G. Ciccotti, MD In an austere letter published in Lancetin , Henry J. Morris intro-duced a previously undescribed entity, which he aptly termed “lawn tennis arm.” From that seminal description has evolved a vast array of detailed diagnostic and therapeu-.


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Factors associated with short-term prognosis of conservatively treated lateral epicondylitis by Esther J. Waugh Download PDF EPUB FB2

Among women, these factors were associated with higher final DASH and VAS scores. Conclusions Women and patients who report nerve symptoms are more likely to experience a poorer short-term outcome after PT management of lateral by: Lateral and medial epicondylitis: role of occupational factors.

Shiri R(1), Viikari-Juntura E. Author information: (1)Centre of Expertise for Health and Work Ability, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. @ Epicondylitis is a common upper-extremity musculoskeletal by: Lateral epicondylitis occurs at the lateral part elbow joint where a tendon is attached with bone and causes pain.

The reason of development of lateral epicondylitis is overuse of the forearm. The affected tendon, which is named as Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis, is. To identify factors reported to be associated with outcome of conservative treatment, we reviewed the literature on lateral epicondylitis.

To date, only 1 prognostic study 23 has been published. It is a retrospective study that reported that low pretreatment pain scores, prolonged duration of symptoms, and being female were associated with a Cited by: Recent data suggests that the prevalence of lateral epicondylopathy (LE) in the general population is approximately % to % in men and % to % in women.

3 Prevalence rates as high as 2% to 23% have been reported within occupational populations. 4 – 6 The scientific literature has attempted to identify risk factors associated with LE Cited by: Lateral epicondylitis is a common condition, but relatively little is known about its aetiology and associated risk factors.

We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health. Esther J. Waugh has written: 'factors associated with short-term prognosis of conservatively treated lateral epicondylitis' Asked in Short Stories What is the summary of the short story The Ritual.

Lateral epicondylitis, or “tennis elbow,” is a frequently reported condition in medical care. The complaint is char-acterized by pain over the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, which is aggravated with resisted dorsiflexion of the wrist.5 The incidence in general practice is approxi-mately 4 to 7 per patients per year with an annualFile Size: 99KB.

Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis GREG W. JOHNSON, MD, KARA CADWALLADER, MD, SCOT B. SCHEFFEL, MD, and TED D. EPPERLY, MD, Family Medicine Residency of Idaho, Boise, Idaho L ateral File Size: KB.

History. The history often includes a description of pain over the lateral aspect of the elbow. This pain is typically sharp; it may radiate distally, exacerbated by activities involving gripping, wrist extension or wrist flexion.

2,5,9 Aggravating and relieving factors should be identified, as well as motor weakness that may signify radial nerve involvement. Lateral epicondylitis, or tennis elbow, is the most common overuse injury of the elbow and is observed up to 10 times more frequently than medial epicondylitis.

Lateral epicondylitis is usually precipitated by repetitive contraction of the wrist extensors and is characterized by aching pain that is worsened with activity.

Labelle, H, Guibert, R. Efficacy of diclofenac in lateral epicondylitis of the elbow also treated with immobilization. The University of Montreal Orthopaedic Research Group. Arch Fam Med. ;6: – Cited by:   Pain over the lateral epicondyle of the humerus during loading of the wrist extensor muscles is a common musculoskeletal presentation in men and women between 35 and 54 years of age.

43 The above symptom is associated with a clinical diagnosis of lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET), also known as tennis elbow or lateral epicondylalgia. Lateral elbow tendinopathy affects approximately 1% Cited by: Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis, is a condition in which the outer part of the elbow becomes painful and tender.

The pain may also extend into the back of the forearm and grip strength may be weak. Onset of symptoms is generally gradual. Golfer's elbow is a similar condition that affects the inside of the elbow. It is due to excessive use of the muscles of the back of the Specialty: Orthopedics, sports medicine.

Most cases of lateral epicondylitis can be treated conservatively. Surgical interventions are recommended when symptoms persist 6 to 12 months with non-surgical intervention.1,5.

Below is an example of a physical therapy protocol post-surgical intervention: (Note this is only one therapist’s treatment plan and variations can occur) Phase I. Lateral epicondylitis – Causes. Lateral epicondylitis is caused by damage to a tendon. Tendons connects muscles to bone.

Repetitive or stressful movements of the muscles causes strain and pain at the tendon. The tendons associated with lateral epicondylitis are connected to forearm muscles. Background: Lateral epicondylitis is a common painful elbow disorder.

Several approaches to treatment have been proposed, with a local injection of corticosteroids being the most frequently used. A randomized study of autologous conditioned plasma and steroid injections in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

Int Orthop. Nov. 39 (11) Herquelot E, Guéguen A, Roquelaure Y, Bodin J, Sérazin C, Ha C, et al. Work-related risk factors for incidence of lateral epicondylitis in a large working population.

Physical therapy for the treatment of lateral epicondylitis (LE) often comprises movement therapies, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ECSWT), low level laser therapy (LLLT), low frequency electrical stimulation or pulsed electromagnetic fields. Still, only ECSWT and LLLT have been meta-analytically researched.

PUBMED, EMBASE and Cochrane database were systematically searched Cited by: Lateral epicondylitis (also referred to as tennis elbow, or more accurately as lateral epicondylosis) is a well-recognized cumulative trauma disorder representing a significant burden in terms of employee disability, health care costs, and loss of productivity.

The associated risk factors and available treatment options should become familiar to providers in primary care, occupational medicine. Trevor Langford explores the recent thinking on lateral epicondylitis. As well as describing the anatomy and biomechanics of the structures involved, he also considers the best-practice assessment, treatment and rehabilitation protocols.

Lateral epicondylitis (LE) – commonly referred to as tennis elbow – is the most frequently diagnosed condition affecting the elbow. Tennis players often.Although many tennis players may experience this condition, most cases are associated with work-related activities or have no obvious precipitating event.

As a result, the term now most widely used is lateral epicondylitis. Yet, this name implies a pathological basis that is contrary to longstanding, albeit evolving, evidence that it is not an Cited by: Lateral epicondylitis, or “tennis elbow,” is an overuse injury characterized by an inflammation of the muscle tendons that attach to the outside of the lateral epicondyle is a bone marking on the distal humerus that serves as the origin for several muscles of the forearm.

Of these muscles, the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscle is most commonly involved with tennis elbow.